Letters: Camp Meeting, Church and Pets, Musical Interludes Our listeners write in with their reactions to stories last week on the Salem Camp Meeting, a church that caters to pets and music choices on the program.
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Letters: Camp Meeting, Church and Pets, Musical Interludes

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Letters: Camp Meeting, Church and Pets, Musical Interludes

Letters: Camp Meeting, Church and Pets, Musical Interludes

Letters: Camp Meeting, Church and Pets, Musical Interludes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4789175/4789176" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Our listeners write in with their reactions to stories last week on the Salem Camp Meeting, a church that caters to pets and music choices on the program.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters.

Kathy Lohr's piece last week on the long-running Salem Bible camp meeting and the story by Jason DeRose on a Virginia church that offers services for people and their pets drew much angry mail. `Has the religious right taken over completely?' asks Gary Tifell(ph) of Venice, California. `Is NPR now a Christian network? Are you trying to curry favor with the FCC? This is not what I listen and contribute to NPR for. I object to this proselytizing. Please spare me the Christian stories. These are not news.'

Grace Growpelard(ph) of Keyport, New Jersey, added, `Let's leave salvation to our churches, mosques and synagogues and not public radio. Separation of church and state should apply to our public and private acts of devotion as well.'

And Nagel Jackson(ph) of Princeton Junction, New Jersey, writes, `In your story about the uplifting atmosphere of the Georgia-based Salem camp meeting, what you did not mention is that it is, of course, whites only and always has been. The hypocrisy is self-evident.'

On a different subject, some of you object to the amount of rock 'n' roll we feature on this program. Jackson Parkhurst(ph) of Brevard, North Carolina, writes, `I have been suffering for years through the awful music and musicians, predominantly rock 'n' roll, that Liane Hansen has interviewed Sunday after Sunday on WEEKEND EDITION. I find it incredible that adults take seriously and program adolescent music. There is so much good music in the world, but all we hear on your show is dark, dull and shallow stuff for those stuck in their teen years.'

But Alan Castro(ph) of Los Angeles, disagrees. `Firstly, you cover very good rock bands and not just rock bands. Secondly, you are bringing in programming that is more interesting to a highly desirable younger demographic. For NPR listeners about to rock, I salute you.'

Finally, a reminder. NPR has done many segments on summer reading. And now, we would like to know what you are reading this year. What's kept you absorbed during this scorching season? Now we don't want a list of books, just the one that will stay with you after summer ends. We also want to know why you liked it, but please be brief. Go to our Web site, npr.org, and click on the `contact us' link. Follow the instructions. And in the subject line for your message, please write `What I'm reading.' Please be sure to include your phone number. We plan to get in touch with some of you to record your comments, which will be broadcast on our show Labor Day weekend.

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