Letters: Gas Prices, Thompson, Apatow, Jell-O Liane Hansen reads some letters from our listeners. Topics of interest include gas prices, Hunter Thompson's funeral, writer-director Judd Apatow and Jell-O.
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Letters: Gas Prices, Thompson, Apatow, Jell-O

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Letters: Gas Prices, Thompson, Apatow, Jell-O

Letters: Gas Prices, Thompson, Apatow, Jell-O

Letters: Gas Prices, Thompson, Apatow, Jell-O

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4820836/4820837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Liane Hansen reads some letters from our listeners. Topics of interest include gas prices, Hunter Thompson's funeral, writer-director Judd Apatow and Jell-O.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Time now for your letters. The conversation last week with Scott Horsley about gas prices included a reference to the relatively small percentage of a household budget that goes for gasoline, approximately three cents out of every dollar. That drew a number of letters including one from Alfred Oxton(ph) of Tonopah, Arizona. `Fuel is most often the single largest item in my budget, vying only with groceries for first place,' he writes. `I rarely eat out, haven't bought a pair of shoes in years, can't afford it. It may be that fuel is still relatively inexpensive compared to other countries or compared to items in the household wallet; however, that does not excuse nor explain the exorbitant and obscene profits the oil companies are making. There is something terribly wrong here.'

Our reports on the funeral of journalist Hunter Thompson and the death of ALS victim and essayist Seth Carey drew this letter from Mike Krimm(ph) of Squim, Washington. `Maybe it was just me, but the juxtaposition of a story about a writer who commits suicide followed by a story of a victim of ALS made me blink twice. We have lost two good writers, people who have enriched our lives by their written word. It's sad that one died by his own hand, the other fought to the end. Both of them sounded like they liked a good laugh and rock 'n' roll.'

And our interview with Judd Apatow, the director of the film, "The 40-Year-Old Virgin," drew a number of letters. Dale Sharrod(ph) of Longmont, Colorado, was offended. `The strong implication was that virginity is weird and abnormal. The final statement of poor taste was that virgins should be strong, take a chance and be big. Not only was the interview in extremely poor taste, it was a pathetic attempt to show an artificial macho personality. Poor job, NPR. You flunked on that interview. I am a gynecologist in private practice. Believe me, the loss of virginity is not a glorious medal of honor. I have many real life clinical examples to prove that point.'

Finally, Bonny Wolf's commentary on the comeback of Jell-O prompted this note from Whitney Cox(ph) of Lockport, Illinois. `Retro? Retro? How can Jell-O be retro when it never went away? My 83-year-old dad still makes lime Jell-O with lettuce in it and a dollop of mayonnaise on top. Go ahead, try telling my dad he's retro.' We wouldn't think of it.

To write to us, go to npr.org and click on contact us. And please tell us where you live and how to pronounce your name.

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