Rebuilding after Disaster As the floodwaters recede and search-and-rescue operations slow, attention turns to assessing the damage and looking at long-term prospects in the Gulf Coast region. We look at what the stories of other disaster-sticken communities can teach us about the future for Katrina's victims.
NPR logo

Rebuilding after Disaster

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4836350/4836351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Rebuilding after Disaster

Rebuilding after Disaster

Rebuilding after Disaster

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4836350/4836351" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the floodwaters recede and search-and-rescue operations slow, attention turns to assessing the damage and looking at long-term prospects in the Gulf Coast region. We look at what the stories of other disaster-sticken communities can teach us about the future for Katrina's victims.

Guests:

Walter Peacock, director of the Hazard Reduction and Recovery Center at Texas A&M University; author of Hurricane Andrew: Ethnicity, Gender and the Sociology of Disaster

Chuck Cantasano, resident of Port Charlotte, Fla.; has spent 13 months rebuilding home due to Hurricane Charley, a Category 4 storm that hit Florida in 2004

Rick Duquette, city administrator of Grand Forks, N.D.

Casey Green, head of Special Collections at the Rosenberg Library in Galveston, Texas; co-editor of Through a Night of Horrors: Voices from the 1900 Galveston Storm