Preparing for Future Disasters As the Gulf Coast states struggle to recover from Hurricane Katrina, people are asking what can be done to prepare for the next disaster. From a massive hurricane in the East to a major earthquake in California, how are communities readying for their own worst-case scenarios? And what can be done now to mitigate damage from future catastrophes?
NPR logo

Preparing for Future Disasters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4851388/4851389" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Preparing for Future Disasters

Preparing for Future Disasters

Preparing for Future Disasters

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4851388/4851389" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the Gulf Coast states struggle to recover from Hurricane Katrina, people are asking what can be done to prepare for the next disaster. From a massive hurricane in the East to a major earthquake in California, how are communities readying for their own worst-case scenarios? And what can be done now to mitigate damage from future catastrophes?

Guests:

Kathleen Tierney, director, Natural Hazards Center; professor, Department of Sociology and Institute of Behavioral Sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder

Henry Petroski, author, Pushing the Limits: New Adventures in Engineering; Aleksandar S. Vesic Professor of Civil Engineering; professor of history at the Pratt School of Engineering at Duke University in Durham, N.C.

Lucile Jones, scientist-in-charge, Southern California Earthquake Hazards Team; U.S. Geological Survey in Pasadena, Calif.

Rich Eisner, regional administrator, Coastal Region in the Governor's Office of Emergency Services in Oakland, Calif.

Books Featured In This Story