Looking for Answers in Gentilly Neighborhood New Orleans is still off limits to most of its residents. NPR's Cheryl Corley drove to the city's Gentilly neighborhood to check out evacuee Mary Jacobs' home, and called her with a report.
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Looking for Answers in Gentilly Neighborhood

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Looking for Answers in Gentilly Neighborhood

Looking for Answers in Gentilly Neighborhood

Looking for Answers in Gentilly Neighborhood

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Mary Jacobs had just finished remodeling her small three-bedroom home when Hurricane Katrina flooded New Olreans. Cheryl Corley, NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley, NPR

Mary Jacobs had just finished remodeling her small three-bedroom home when Hurricane Katrina flooded New Olreans.

Cheryl Corley, NPR

New Orleans is still off limits to most of its residents. A re-entry program for a few areas — including the French Quarter — is underway. But it's no help to people like Mary Jacobs, a 48-year-old hospital worker with a home in the city's hard-hit Gentilly neighborhood. Jacobs, her husband and 14 other family members ended up in Chicago. NPR's Cheryl Corley drove to Gentilly to check out Jacobs' home and called her with a report.