Battered Oaks Ready for New Orleans Comeback New Orleans' broad, shady live oak trees lend the city much charm. Many urban foresters had feared the flooded trees might die after spending weeks with roots submerged in a salty, polluted brew. Now the city has dried out and tree experts are going in to assess the damage.
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Battered Oaks Ready for New Orleans Comeback

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Battered Oaks Ready for New Orleans Comeback

Battered Oaks Ready for New Orleans Comeback

Battered Oaks Ready for New Orleans Comeback

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Live oaks, planted as street trees in urban New Orleans, suffered extensive damage from winds and flooding. Robert Souvestre hide caption

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Robert Souvestre

Live oaks, planted as street trees in urban New Orleans, suffered extensive damage from winds and flooding.

Robert Souvestre

New Orleans' broad, shady live oak trees lend the city much charm. Many urban foresters had feared the flooded trees might die after spending weeks with roots submerged in a salty, polluted brew. Now the city has dried out and tree experts are going in to assess the damage.

Scientists such as Louisiana State University's Hallie Dozier are taking soil samples to check for toxins. They'll also watch for long-term effects from the shock of flooding.

For now, Dozier says the biggest danger comes from the frantic rebuilding of the city, as people work with bulldozers and chainsaws around these already weakened trees.