French Riots Underscore Racial Inequity Unrest in France has spread from the immigrant communities of the Paris suburbs to some 300 towns across the country. James Graff, Time magazine's Paris bureau chief, says the riots show that the French vision of color-blind equality doesn't work in reality.
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French Riots Underscore Racial Inequity

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French Riots Underscore Racial Inequity

French Riots Underscore Racial Inequity

French Riots Underscore Racial Inequity

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Firefighters spray water on a burning bus in Reynerie in the suburbs of the southwestern city of Toulouse, after youths set fire to it and three cars, Nov. 7. Reuters hide caption

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Unrest in France has spread from the immigrant communities of the Paris suburbs to some 300 towns across the country. One person has died as a result of the violence. It was sparked by the death of two French-African teenagers, who thought they were being chased by police, on Oct. 27.

James Graff, Time magazine's Paris bureau chief, says the riots show that the French vision of color-blind equality doesn't work in reality. Many who are participating in the riots are immigrants who feel they are treated as second-class citizens.