Finally, Some Good News Senior news analyst Daniel Schorr takes this Thanskgiving Eve to note two good news items this week: successful negotiations over a constitution in Bosnia-Herzegovina and the apparent health of democracy in Germany.
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Finally, Some Good News

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Finally, Some Good News

Finally, Some Good News

Finally, Some Good News

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Senior news analyst Daniel Schorr takes this Thanskgiving Eve to note two good news items this week: successful negotiations over a constitution in Bosnia-Herzegovina and the apparent health of democracy in Germany.

DANIEL SCHORR:

What with it being Thanksgiving Eve and all, I thought I'd concentrate on some of the good news of the day.

ROBERT SIEGEL, host:

News analyst Daniel Schorr says he sees a few reasons for giving thanks this year.

SCHORR: First, Iraq, where Shiite, Sunni and Kurdish leaders have all agreed to ask for a time line for the withdrawal of American troops. And according to The Washington Post, the military brass is now considering a pullout next year of up to a third of the 150,000 American troops now deployed. So much for staying the course.

Also, Republican Congresswoman Jean Schmidt of Ohio, who last week during a stormy House debate, attacked Marine veteran, Representative John Murtha, saying, `Cowards cut and run; the Marines never do.' She has sent Murtha a note of apology.

In Bosnia, where the American-backed Dayton Accords brought a decade of peace after a bloody war, Serbs, Croats and Muslims have now embarked on an effort to unify their splintered government.

Germany, 60 years after Hitler's defeat, has a functioning democracy. It has just installed its first female chancellor, Angela Merkel, to head a grand coalition government of Christian Democrats and Social Democrats.

The other defeated enemy, Japan, has come back from occupation and is now planning to rejoin the family of nations by revising its American-dictated constitution to give full recognition to its military.

In Haiti, enough peace has been restored to permit American Embassy officials to return.

The much-maligned emergency agency FEMA, responding to a wave of condemnation, has relented, at least for now, on evicting Katrina victims from government-paid hotel rooms.

And finally, President Bush has ceremoniously pardoned two turkeys, perhaps brushing up on his pardon powers. This is Daniel Schorr.

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