China's Rapid Development and the Environment Critics say that China's rapid economic growth leads to pollution in the air and water, and leaves mountains of untreated waste. In one recent incident, an explosion at a Chinese chemical plant spilled benzene into a major river, cutting off the water supply to thousands. As part of an ongoing series on China in the 21st century, experts and guests examine the country's environmental record.
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China's Rapid Development and the Environment

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China's Rapid Development and the Environment

China's Rapid Development and the Environment

China's Rapid Development and the Environment

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Critics say that China's rapid economic growth leads to pollution in the air and water, and leaves mountains of untreated waste. In one recent incident, an explosion at a Chinese chemical plant spilled benzene into a major river, cutting off the water supply to thousands. As part of an ongoing series on China in the 21st century, experts and guests examine the country's environmental record.

Guest:

Elizabeth Economy, director of Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations; author of The River Runs Black: The Environmental Challenge to China's Future