Marty Stuart Finds His Way Back : World Cafe Marty Stuart has a handful of new albums that celebrate American roots music. Soul's Chapel is based on gospel; Badlands is an homage to the Lakota tribe; and Live at the Ryman focuses on bluegrass.
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Marty Stuart in Studio on World Cafe - 01/24/2006

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Marty Stuart Finds His Way Back

Marty Stuart Finds His Way Back

Marty Stuart in Studio on World Cafe - 01/24/2006

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5168394/5168401" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Set List

Songs Marty Stuart plays for 'World Cafe':

  • "It's Time to Go Home"
  • "Slow Train Movin' On"
  • "Comin' to the House of the Lord"

Marty Stuart is back with two new albums, Soul's Chapel, recorded with his Fabulous Superlatives, and Badlands: Ballads of the Lakota.

Marty Stuart is putting out three albums in the span of just seven months. hide caption

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But that's not all. On Feb. 7, Stuart will be releasing Live at the Ryman, an album of bluegrass songs played in Nashville's storied hall.

Stuart says the steady flow of work stems from his attempts to right himself after a DUI offense led to a stint in jail. At a Chicago show shortly after his release, Mavis and Yvonne Staples gave him Pops Staples' old guitar.

Well-known as a collector of music memorabilia, Stuart says the gift led to introspection — and change.

In a career that has spanned from playing with Johnny Cash to serving as president of the Country Music Foundation, Stuart has seen plenty of change, in himself and in country music.

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