Bush Defends Domestic Surveillance Program President Bush defends his controversial executive order allowing the National Security Agency to conduct spying within the United States without a warrant. The president made his arguments during a speech on the campus of Kansas State University.
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Bush Defends Domestic Surveillance Program

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Bush Defends Domestic Surveillance Program

Bush Defends Domestic Surveillance Program

Bush Defends Domestic Surveillance Program

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5168816/5168817" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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President George Bush at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kan., Jan. 23. Reuters hide caption

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Reuters

President Bush defends his controversial executive order allowing the National Security Agency to conduct spying within the United States without a warrant. The president made his arguments during a speech on the campus of Kansas State University — and took questions from students and others at the event.

The White House says the spying is authorized by the Constitution and the emergency powers passed by Congress after the Sept. 11 attacks. Critics say the President has overstepped the bounds of his authority.