Festival Honors Short Films Shot on Cell Phones Ithaca College in upstate New York is sponsoring a contest for the best short film shot with a cell phone camera. Entries can be no longer than 30 seconds and must include music, dialogue or other audio.
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Festival Honors Short Films Shot on Cell Phones

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Festival Honors Short Films Shot on Cell Phones

Festival Honors Short Films Shot on Cell Phones

Festival Honors Short Films Shot on Cell Phones

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5175556/5175566" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Cell phones do just about anything these days. You can send e-mail, download music — and on some new phones, you can even capture video. But can you make a real movie with a cell phone?

Ithaca College in upstate New York has launched a contest to find out. It's called Cellflix. Like any film festival, there are judges and there's even a $5,000 grand prize. To qualify, submissions had to be shot on a cell phone or smartphone, be no longer than 30 seconds and include music, dialogue or other audio.

Ithaca College film student Sudhanshu Saria's short movie is a finalist in the Cellflix Festival. Courtesy Sudhanshu Saria hide caption

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Courtesy Sudhanshu Saria