Confiscated Knockoffs to Be Given to Katrina Victims New York City is donating thousands of knockoffs to Hurricane Katrina victims -- fake versions of famous clothing brands such as Nike and Phat Farm. The goods were seized by the NYPD in raids on counterfeiters. New York's mayor says designers agreed the fakes should be given away instead of being destroyed.
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Confiscated Knockoffs to Be Given to Katrina Victims

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Confiscated Knockoffs to Be Given to Katrina Victims

Confiscated Knockoffs to Be Given to Katrina Victims

Confiscated Knockoffs to Be Given to Katrina Victims

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5184985/5184986" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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New York City is donating thousands of knockoffs to Hurricane Katrina victims — fake versions of famous clothing brands such as Nike and Phat Farm. The goods were seized by the NYPD in raids on counterfeiters. New York's mayor says designers agreed the fakes should be given away instead of being destroyed.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, host:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer. Who cares if it's the real thing, if it helps? New York City is donating thousands of knockoffs to hurricane Katrina victims. These are fake versions of famous brand clothing, imitators of Nike and Phat Farm, among others. The goods were seized by NYPD in raids on counterfeiters. New York's mayor says, designers agreed the fakes should be given away instead of being destroyed. This is MORNING EDITION.

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