A Gold Medal, Lost in a Flash American snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis lost a gold medal at the Olympics when she hotdogged at the end of her run. It was a painful way to learn the difference between being a star and being a champion.
NPR logo

A Gold Medal, Lost in a Flash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5223065/5223066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
A Gold Medal, Lost in a Flash

A Gold Medal, Lost in a Flash

A Gold Medal, Lost in a Flash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5223065/5223066" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

American snowboarder Lindsey Jacobellis lost a gold medal at the Olympics when she hotdogged at the end of her run. It was a painful way to learn the difference between being a star and being a champion.

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

Until he finally said, She definitely styled a little too hard there. Snowboard racing, pipelining, the half pipe, the double half calf mocha- chino, and whatever they call the other new Olympic sports, were included to bring a little new zing into the old games. You can't want to put their flash zing and bling on primetime TV and then expect young performers to act with the circumspection of Condoleezza Rice.

SIMON: 00 in the morning, morning after morning, to achieve something. And last night she suggested to reporters in a conference call that what they called showboating she considers joy. I was having fun, she said. Snowboarding is fun. I was ahead. I wanted to share my enthusiasm with the crowd. I messed up. Oh well. It happens. It does.

(SOUNDBITE OF ELLA FITZGERALD SONG)

SIMON: Ella. Who else. Eighteen minutes past the hour.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

Related NPR Stories