Product Complexity Befuddles Many Consumers Fifty percent of the products returned for being broken are actually in perfect working order. According to a Dutch researcher, it's complexity that leads many to the customer service desk. Americans give up after an average of 20 minutes of futzing with an electronic device. Companies write off most of these complaints as a nuisance.
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Product Complexity Befuddles Many Consumers

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Product Complexity Befuddles Many Consumers

Product Complexity Befuddles Many Consumers

Product Complexity Befuddles Many Consumers

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  • Transcript

Fifty percent of the products returned for being broken are actually in perfect working order. According to a Dutch researcher, it's complexity that leads many to the customer service desk. Americans give up after an average of 20 minutes of futzing with an electronic device. Companies write off most of these complaints as a nuisance.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. Fifty percent of the products returned for being broken are actually in perfect working order. According to a Dutch researcher, it's complexity that leads many to the customer service desk, and Americans give up after an average of 20 minutes of futzing with an electronic device. Companies write off most of these complaints as a nuisance, but the author of the thesis argues if enough people can't figure out how to use a product, it's probably badly designed. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

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