Ports Controversy Not Entirely Resolved A Dubai-owned company is backing away from a plan to manage terminal operations at some U.S. ports. Under political pressure from Congress, Dubai Ports World says it is transferring operations to an unspecified American "entity." Democrats in Congress want to hear more before giving their seal of approval.
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Ports Controversy Not Entirely Resolved

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Ports Controversy Not Entirely Resolved

Ports Controversy Not Entirely Resolved

Ports Controversy Not Entirely Resolved

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5255721/5255722" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY), Christopher Dodd (D-CT), Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) leave a media conference while Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) continues speaking. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Senators Hillary Rodham Clinton (D-NY), Christopher Dodd (D-CT), Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) leave a media conference while Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) continues speaking.

Alex Wong/Getty Images

A Dubai-owned company is backing away from a plan to manage terminal operations at some U.S. ports.

Under political pressure from Congress, Dubai Ports World says it is transferring operations to an unspecified American "entity."

Democrats in Congress want to hear more before giving their seal of approval. They want to know if DP World is fully divesting itself of the operations, or just masking its interest in them.