Gasp! Goldfish Surviving in L.A. River Water Two goldfish have been living in a bowl of Los Angeles River water at the offices of The Los Angeles Times for nearly two weeks, part of an experiment to see just how dirty the river water is since city officials have announced a plan to clean it up. The fishes' every move is monitored by a Web-linked camera.
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Gasp! Goldfish Surviving in L.A. River Water

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Gasp! Goldfish Surviving in L.A. River Water

Gasp! Goldfish Surviving in L.A. River Water

Gasp! Goldfish Surviving in L.A. River Water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5290118/5290119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Little Ed (top), named for City Councilman Ed Reyes, and Little Antonio -- named for Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa -- seem to be thriving in the much-maligned river water. Carlos Chavez/Los Angeles Times hide caption

See the Fish Live
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Carlos Chavez/Los Angeles Times

Two goldfish have been living in a bowl of Los Angeles River water at the offices of The Los Angeles Times for nearly two weeks, part of an experiment to see just how dirty the river water is since city officials have announced a plan to clean it up.

The fishes' every move is monitored by a camera linked to the Times Web site -- Alex Chadwick gets an update on the fish from Los Angeles Times Metro reporter Steve Hymon.