Bernanke Takes First Step Guiding Interest Rates Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is leading his first meeting of the committee that sets key interest rates. It's expected to raise them again today. Commentator Ev Ehrlich says this is the legacy of former chairman Alan Greenspan, and we'll have to wait a little longer to see how the new chairman makes his mark.
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Bernanke Takes First Step Guiding Interest Rates

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Bernanke Takes First Step Guiding Interest Rates

Bernanke Takes First Step Guiding Interest Rates

Bernanke Takes First Step Guiding Interest Rates

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5306117/5306118" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke is leading his first meeting of the committee that sets key interest rates. It's expected to raise them again today. Commentator Ev Ehrlich says this is the legacy of former chairman Alan Greenspan, and we'll have to wait a little longer to see how the new chairman makes his mark.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Commentator Ev Ehrlich is a former undersecretary of commerce, and he says if rates go up today, it is because of a decision made a while ago by Bernanke's predecessor, Alan Greenspan.

EV EHRLICH: When he makes that decision, it will then become the Bernanke, not the Greenspan, Fed.

INSKEEP: It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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