Saddam Grilled About Shiite Executions of 1982 Saddam Hussein is cross-examined for the first time about his alleged role in the killing of more than 140 Shiite villagers after a failed assassination attempt. When prosecutors presented documents they said proved that some of those executed were minors, the former Iraqi leader said they were likely forged.
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Saddam Grilled About Shiite Executions of 1982

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Saddam Grilled About Shiite Executions of 1982

Saddam Grilled About Shiite Executions of 1982

Saddam Grilled About Shiite Executions of 1982

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Saddam Hussein is cross examined for the first time about his alleged role in the killing of more than 140 Shiite villagers after a failed assassination attempt. When prosecutors presented documents they said proved some of those executed were minors, the former Iraqi leader said they were likely forged.

Prosecutors pressed Saddam as they presented the documents, asking each time, "Is this your signature?" "Did you sign this?" He was asked how he could endorse the execution of more than 140 people from the Shiite village of Dujail only two days after they'd been referred to a revolutionary court.

Saddam said he signed the orders because evidence proved the accused were all involved in the attempt on his life.