Lost Lester Young Jam Session Turns Up This week, the Library of Congress announced 50 more audio recordings it will preserve... and the discovery of a previously unknown recording by jazzman Lester Young. The piece was recorded in 1940, probably in New York City.
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Lost Lester Young Jam Session Turns Up

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Lost Lester Young Jam Session Turns Up

Lost Lester Young Jam Session Turns Up

Lost Lester Young Jam Session Turns Up

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This week, the Library of Congress announced 50 more audio recordings it will preserve... and the discovery of a previously unknown recording by jazzman Lester Young. The piece was recorded in 1940, probably in New York City.

Lester Young playing at a charity concert in August 1953. He died in 1959. Ronald Startup/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Ronald Startup/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Lester Young playing at a charity concert in August 1953. He died in 1959.

Ronald Startup/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

SCOTT SIMON, Host:

We think it's possible that the Library buried the lead, because this week they also announced the discovery a rare find, a previously unknown recording of Lester Young. The master of the tenor sax is heard jamming with Chad Collins, J.C. Higginbotham, Sammy Price and Doc West in December, 1940, maybe at the Village Vanguard in New York. One jazz fan compared it to finding a Shakespeare sonnet or a short story by Ernest Hemmingway. So let's just listen and enjoy it.

(SOUNDBITE OF JAZZ RECORDING)

SIMON: Lester Young, at 22 minutes before the hour.

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