Bowling for a Business The owner of a bowling alley in North Dakota has decided he wants out of the business. So he's holding a tournament. The prize? The bowling alley itself. For a $250 entry fee, Star City Lanes could be yours. The owner is expecting $150,000 in entry fees. But you don't have to be a good to win the tournament. The building, and all its contents, will go to the contestant who bowls closest to his or her average.
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Bowling for a Business

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Bowling for a Business

Bowling for a Business

Bowling for a Business

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The owner of a bowling alley in North Dakota has decided he wants out of the business. So he's holding a tournament. The prize? The bowling alley itself. For a $250 entry fee, Star City Lanes could be yours. The owner is expecting $150,000 in entry fees. But you don't have to be a good to win the tournament. The building, and all its contents, will go to the contestant who bowls closest to his or her average.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

The owner of a bowling alley in North Dakota has decided he wants out of the business. So he's holding a tournament. The prize? The bowling alley itself. For a $250 entry fee, Star City Lanes could be yours. The owner is expecting $150,000 in entry fees. But you don't have to be a good to win the tournament. The building, and all its contents, will go to the contestant who bowls closest to his or her average.

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