Changing Parties -- and Sexes -- in Utah Can a Democrat (who use to be a Republican) and a woman (who used to be a man) win a legislative seat in one of the most conservative states in the nation? Jenny Brundin reports on the personal and political journey of an unlikely politician.
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Changing Parties -- and Sexes -- in Utah

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Changing Parties -- and Sexes -- in Utah

Changing Parties — and Sexes — in Utah

Changing Parties -- and Sexes -- in Utah

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5355488/5355489" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Jennifer Lee Jackson was once an official in the Mormon church. Courtesy Jennifer Lee Jackson hide caption

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Courtesy Jennifer Lee Jackson

Can a Democrat (who use to be a Republican) and a woman (who used to be a man) win a legislative seat in one of the most conservative states in the nation?

As a man, Jennifer Lee Jackson once served as a Republican city council member in Sandy City, Utah and was even an official in the Mormon church.

Hear the Original Story

Jennifer Lee Jackson was the subject of a 40-minute, two-part profile first heard on member station KUER in Salt Lake City, Utah:

She's now become a woman, switched political parties and is running for a seat in the State Senate. Jenny Brundin of member station KUER in Salt Lake City reports on the personal and political journey of an unlikely politician.