A 'Greatest' Generation: Linking Personality, Eras How much does the era you grow up in affect your personality? Psychologist Jean Twenge, a researcher at San Diego State University believes that a key factor in determining primary character traits is the generation that people are born in — and there may be credence to the notion of "The Greatest Generation."
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A 'Greatest' Generation: Linking Personality, Eras

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A 'Greatest' Generation: Linking Personality, Eras

A 'Greatest' Generation: Linking Personality, Eras

A 'Greatest' Generation: Linking Personality, Eras

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5415070/5415071" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How much does the era you grow up in affect your personality? Psychologist Jean Twenge, a researcher at San Diego State University, believes that a key factor in determining primary character traits is the generation that people are born in -- and there may be credence to the notion of "The Greatest Generation."

Her book's title encapsulates her argument: Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled -- and More Miserable than Ever Before.

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