The Dangers of Stargazing Somehow, a California man got stuck going down the chimney of someone else's house. Matthew Allen was jammed near the bottom of the chimney for hours. He finally pulled off his pants and waved them around to set off motion detectors in the house. Police responded three times before they found him. Once he was rescued, police charged him with burglary. He denies it, saying he was climbing on the roof to look at the stars when he just fell in.
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The Dangers of Stargazing

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The Dangers of Stargazing

The Dangers of Stargazing

The Dangers of Stargazing

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Somehow, a California man got stuck going down the chimney of someone else's house. Matthew Allen was jammed near the bottom of the chimney for hours. He finally pulled off his pants and waved them around to set off motion detectors in the house. Police responded three times before they found him. Once he was rescued, police charged him with burglary. He denies it, saying he was climbing on the roof to look at the stars when he just fell in.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good Morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Somehow, a California man got stuck going down the chimney of someone else's house. Matthew Allen was jammed near the bottom of the chimney for hours. He finally pulled off his pants and waved them around to set off motion detectors in the house. Police responded three times before they found him. Once he was rescued, police charged him with burglary. He denies it, saying he was climbing on the roof to look at the stars when he just fell in the chimney.

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