The Psychology of the Sports Fan Sports stadiums have long been filled with a curious breed. The sports fan is a strange, sometimes tragic figure who often goes into a frenzy over nothing more significant than a jersey color. An exploration of the psychology of the sport fan.
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The Psychology of the Sports Fan

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The Psychology of the Sports Fan

The Psychology of the Sports Fan

The Psychology of the Sports Fan

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5468384/5468385" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

What are the roots of all this rooting? iStockPhoto.com hide caption

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Sports stadiums have long been filled with a curious breed. The sports fan is a strange, sometimes tragic figure who often goes into a frenzy over nothing more significant than a jersey color. An exploration of the mental makeup of those who root.

Guests:

Ed Hirt, associate professor of psychological and brain sciences at Indiana University

David Potter, professor of Greek and Latin at University of Michigan; writes a Chicago Tribune RedEye column about how the Romans look at modern sports

Richard Deitsch, associate editor, Sports Illustrated