Cleric Tied to Bali Bombings Leaves Prison Abu Bakar Bashir, a militant Islamic cleric, walks out of an Indonesian prison after serving 26 months for conspiracy in the deadly 2002 Bali bombings. Some consider him the most dangerous man in South Asia. Others say evidence against Bashir was weak.
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Cleric Tied to Bali Bombings Leaves Prison

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Cleric Tied to Bali Bombings Leaves Prison

Cleric Tied to Bali Bombings Leaves Prison

Cleric Tied to Bali Bombings Leaves Prison

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5484048/5484049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Abu Bakar Bashir, alleged leader of the radical Islamic group Jemaah Islamiyah, speaks to journalists after being freed from a jail in Jakarta. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Abu Bakar Bashir, alleged leader of the radical Islamic group Jemaah Islamiyah, speaks to journalists after being freed from a jail in Jakarta.

Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Abu Bakar Bashir, a militant Islamic cleric, walks out of an Indonesian prison after serving 26 months for conspiracy in the deadly 2002 Bali bombings. He is reputed to be a key member of the terrorist group key member of the Southeast Asian terror group Jemaah Islamiyah.

Many legal observers say evidence linking Bashir to the bombings was weak. The blasts killed 202 people on the Indonesia island, many of them Australian tourists. The group Jemaah Islamiyah is accused of a bombing campaign across Indonesia that has claimed more than 260 lives since 2000.