Two Ads Worth Watching So I haven't been blogging for the past few weeks, mainly because I've been working with NPR's Pentagon Correspondent Tom Bowman. We've been focusing mainly on the various investigations into allegations that U.S. Marines massacred 24 people in the Iraqi town of Haditha, 11 of them women and children. Really, really interesting stuff, but not exactly the most uplifting... and of course blogging being in my blood now, I couldn't help surfing, I mean researching, in the few minutes I had to spare. And on the basis of two ads I've seen only on the net, I've come to the conclusion that there are a few people in the ad business who spend a little too much time on the playa.
NPR logo Two Ads Worth Watching

Two Ads Worth Watching

"The Big Ad" for Carlton Draught beer. hide caption

View the "Big Ad"
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A scene from the "Happy Mornings" Folgers ad from Saatchi & Saatchi. hide caption

View "Happy Mornings"
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So I haven't been blogging for the past few weeks, mainly because I've been working with NPR's Pentagon Correspondent Tom Bowman. We've been focusing mainly on the various investigations into allegations that U.S. Marines massacred 24 people in the Iraqi town of Haditha, 11 of them women and children.

Really, really interesting stuff, but not exactly the most uplifting... and of course blogging being in my blood now, I couldn't help surfing, I mean researching, in the few minutes I had to spare. And on the basis of two ads I've seen only on the net, I've come to the conclusion that there are a few people in the ad business who spend a little too much time on the playa.

The first is what I guess is called "The Big Ad." It comes from Australia and is for Carlton Draught beer. I've tried to describe this one a couple of times to friends of mine and have failed completely to communicate how great it is. They usually just look at me quizzically (admittedly, not a rare occurrence in my daily life). But it reaffirms one of things that I have always held to be an axiom of the universe: Carmina Burana will make anything dramatic and moving. You could run this under people playing twiddlywinks and it would appear to be a contest for the fate of the world.

The second is by Saatchi and Saatchi for Folgers. I see this one as two things wrapped up in one... the first is a dire dystopic vision of a future where we're all held mental hostage by happy drugs provided by evil corporations (I nervously glance over at my Starbucks Venti Kenya AA sitting innocently next to my keyboard). The second is that obviously Saatchi and Saatchi does not conduct drug testing of its creative employees.