Anatomy of a Shooting: A Civilian's Death in Iraq On June 24, 2005, Iraqi journalist and doctor Yasser Salihee was struck by a bullet fired by Staff Sgt. Joe Romero of the 256th Combat Brigade Team, Louisiana National Guard. Those involved agree the shooting was a mistake. But a year later, that's about all they agree on. A look at the impact of one man's death in Iraq.
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Anatomy of a Shooting: A Civilian's Death in Iraq

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Anatomy of a Shooting: A Civilian's Death in Iraq

Anatomy of a Shooting: A Civilian's Death in Iraq

Anatomy of a Shooting: A Civilian's Death in Iraq

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5506353/5506358" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Yasser Salihee, seen here with his wife Dr. Raghad Wazzan, gave up his job at Yarmouk Hospital to translate for foreign journalists, including NPR. At the time of his death, he was employed by Knight-Ridder newspapers. Courtesy of Salihee Family hide caption

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Courtesy of Salihee Family

Blue marks the approximate patrol area of the 256th combat brigade, which included the site of Salihee's shooting in Amiriyah. Doug Beach, NPR hide caption

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Doug Beach, NPR

Blue marks the approximate patrol area of the 256th combat brigade, which included the site of Salihee's shooting in Amiriyah.

Doug Beach, NPR

Scene of the Shooting

The car of Yasser Salihee
U.S. Army

U.S. Army Official Report

U.S. Army Diagram

A U.S. Army diagram of the shooting shows Romero was standing in front and to the right of Salihee when he fired the fatal shot. U.S. Army hide caption

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U.S. Army

A U.S. Army diagram of the shooting shows Romero was standing in front and to the right of Salihee when he fired the fatal shot.

U.S. Army

Salihee Family Diagram

Aymen Salihee conducted his own investigation of his brother's death. He believes the Army report is a cover-up. "The American soliders are protected by law and do whatever they like," he said. Satellite Image Courtesy of DigitalGlobe hide caption

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Satellite Image Courtesy of DigitalGlobe

Aymen Salihee conducted his own investigation of his brother's death. He believes the Army report is a cover-up. "The American soliders are protected by law and do whatever they like," he said.

Satellite Image Courtesy of DigitalGlobe