Bush Administration Revives Media-Hatred Tradition The Bush administrations has been getting more aggressive in its criticisms of the press.  Senior news analyst Daniel Schorr compares it to another president who held the press in disdain. 
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Bush Administration Revives Media-Hatred Tradition

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Bush Administration Revives Media-Hatred Tradition

Bush Administration Revives Media-Hatred Tradition

Bush Administration Revives Media-Hatred Tradition

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The Bush administrations has been getting more aggressive in its criticisms of the press.  Senior news analyst Daniel Schorr compares it to another president who held the press in disdain. 

DANIEL SCHORR: In recent speeches at Republican fundraisers, President Bush has taken to criticizing the press for baring government secrets.

LIANE HANSEN, Host:

NPR Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr.

SCHORR: It is not clear that the public hates the press as much as officialdom would like to think. A recent Pew Research report found that public attitudes towards the press have been on a downward track for years. Growing numbers of people questioned the news media's patriotism and fairness. And yet most Americans continue to say they like mainstream news outlets.

P: This is Daniel Schorr.

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