Immigration and Citizenship Who deserves to be an American? I was thinking about that today as the House and Senate began holding hearings on immigration reform. That train of thought was reinforced by a news release I received this morning from the Combined Forces Command Press Information Center in Kabul, Afghanistan. In the release, the U.S. military announced that 27 soldiers serving "in the front lines in the war on terror in Afghanistan" had become U.S. citizens. The special July 4th naturalization ceremony was held at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan.

Immigration and Citizenship

Service members recite the oath of U.S. citizenship at Al Faw Palace at Camp Victory, Iraq, July 4, 2006. Sgt. Kristin Kemplin/DOD hide caption

toggle caption
Sgt. Kristin Kemplin/DOD

Who deserves to be an American? I was thinking about that today as the House and Senate began holding hearings on immigration reform. That train of thought was reinforced by a news release I received this morning from the Combined Forces Command Press Information Center in Kabul, Afghanistan.

In the release, the U.S. military announced that 27 soldiers serving "in the front lines in the war on terror in Afghanistan" had become U.S. citizens. The special July 4th naturalization ceremony was held at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. One of the soldiers who became an American citizen was Army Pfc. Joyce Nanquil, originally from the Philippines. According to the military, as she took the oath of allegiance in Afghanistan, her brother, Army Spc. Alfer Nanquil also was taking the oath, but in a different location. He is serving in Iraq.