Putin Passes on Passion for Presidency Russian President Vladimir Putin is explaining why he kissed a boy on the stomach. The President -- who commands several thousand nuclear weapons -- encountered tourists at the Kremlin. Videotape shows him lifting the shirt of a five-year-old to kiss him. He told reporters Thursday that the boy seemed "vulnerable" and "I felt an urge to squeeze him like a kitten." It's not clear if Putin also blew a raspberry. But the boy now says he wants to be president.
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Putin Passes on Passion for Presidency

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Putin Passes on Passion for Presidency

Putin Passes on Passion for Presidency

Putin Passes on Passion for Presidency

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Russian President Vladimir Putin is explaining why he kissed a boy on the stomach. The President — who commands several thousand nuclear weapons — encountered tourists at the Kremlin. Videotape shows him lifting the shirt of a five-year-old to kiss him. He told reporters Thursday that the boy seemed "vulnerable" and "I felt an urge to squeeze him like a kitten." It's not clear if Putin also blew a raspberry. But the boy now says he wants to be president.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

Russian President Vladimir Putin is explaining why he kissed a boy on the stomach. The President, who commands several thousand nuclear weapons, encountered tourists at the Kremlin. Videotape shows him lifting the shirt of a five-year-old, to kiss him. He told reporters yesterday, that the boy seemed vulnerable, and I felt an urge to squeeze him like a kitten. It's not clear if Putin also blew a raspberry. But the boy now says, he too, wants to be president. It's MORNING EDITION.

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