Small Movements: New Devices Help the Paralyzed A paralyzed man with a tiny sensor implanted in his brain has been able to open e-mail and move a robotic hand simply by thinking about it. The man said that learning to be able to control the devices using the sensor took only a few days.
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Small Movements: New Devices Help the Paralyzed

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Small Movements: New Devices Help the Paralyzed

Small Movements: New Devices Help the Paralyzed

Small Movements: New Devices Help the Paralyzed

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5557882/5557883" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A paralyzed man with a tiny sensor implanted in his brain has been able to open e-mail and move a robotic hand simply by thinking about it. The man said that learning to be able to control the devices using the sensor took only a few days.

Guests:

John Donoghue, chief scientific officer, Cyberkinetics Neurotechnology Systems; Wriston professor, Department of Neuroscience, director, Brain Science Program, Brown University

Krishna Shenoy, head, Neural Prosthetic Systems Laboratory; assistant professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Neurosciences Program, Stanford University