Hearing a Wine's Acidity Patrick Taylor of Cuneo Cellars in Carlton, Ore., lets us listen to the sucking sound of an apparatus used to detect acidity in wine. He tells us how it works and why it is important to do this test.
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Hearing a Wine's Acidity

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Hearing a Wine's Acidity

Hearing a Wine's Acidity

Hearing a Wine's Acidity

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This apparatus, a Cash still, tests a wine's acidity. Tom Taylor hide caption

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Tom Taylor

Patrick Taylor of Cuneo Cellars in Carlton, Ore., lets us listen to the sucking sound of a Cash still, which is used to detect acidity in wine. He explains how it works, what causes the vapors that make the gurgling and sucking noises, and why it is important to do this test.