Afrissippi: 'Ngol Jimol' West Africa literally meets Mississippi on Afrissippi's debut album. Guelel Kumba and R.L. Burnside apprentice Eric Deaton find similarities between their respective traditions: Fulani music and Mississippi blues.
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Afrissippi: 'Ngol Jimol'

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Afrissippi: 'Ngol Jimol'

Afrissippi: 'Ngol Jimol'

Afrissippi: 'Ngol Jimol'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5583621/5593811" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Guelel Kumba of Afrissippi hide caption

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Guelel Kumba of Afrissippi

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The debut CD is entitled Fulani Journey hide caption

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Afrissippi's debut album, Fulani Journey, tells the story of Guelel Kumba, a singer-songwriter from the delta of Senegal, West Africa. Kumba moved to Oxford, Mississippi in 2002 after years spent studying sociology in Paris, France. He was awakened to the vibrant Western African music scene in Paris, studied and transcribed traditional Fulani music, and began to interact with popular Senegalese musicians like Salif Keita and Baaba Maal.

In Oxford, he jammed with Eric Deaton, apprentice to the late R.L. Burnside. The two discovered the similarities between the hill country blues of North Mississippi and Kumba's traditional Senegalese melodies, and the nucleus of Afrissippi was born. On Fulani Journey they enlist the region's finest including drummers Cedric Burnside & Kinney Kimbrough, wildman Jimbo Mathus, sax legend Herman Green, and the Taylor Grocery Band.