Debunking the Cell Phone-Lightning Connection A reputable medical journal recently reported that getting struck by lightning is even more damaging if you're talking on your cell phone. However, the story was later debunked in the very same journal. So why hasn't the media corrected the story?
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Debunking the Cell Phone-Lightning Connection

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Debunking the Cell Phone-Lightning Connection

Debunking the Cell Phone-Lightning Connection

Debunking the Cell Phone-Lightning Connection

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A reputable medical journal recently reported that getting struck by lightning is even more damaging if you're talking on your cell phone. However, the story was later debunked in the very same journal.

Dr. Sydney Spiesel, a Yale Medical School professor and Slate contributor, talks with Alex Chadwick about why the media hasn't corrected the story.

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