Teddy Bears and the Law of Unintended Consequences A children's museum in England had almost a million dollars worth of rare teddy bears -- including one once owned by Elvis Presley. It was so valuable that the insurance company required guard dogs. Bad idea. One of the Dobermans went on what museum officials describe as a rampage, shredding hundreds of teddy bears, including the King's -- who had his head ripped off. The museum says this is one hound dog that'll be retired to a farm where he can chase real chickens.
NPR logo

Teddy Bears and the Law of Unintended Consequences

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5616665/5616666" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Teddy Bears and the Law of Unintended Consequences

Teddy Bears and the Law of Unintended Consequences

Teddy Bears and the Law of Unintended Consequences

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5616665/5616666" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A children's museum in England had almost a million dollars worth of rare teddy bears — including one once owned by Elvis Presley. It was so valuable that the insurance company required guard dogs. Bad idea. One of the Dobermans went on what museum officials describe as a rampage, shredding hundreds of teddy bears, including the King's — who had his head ripped off. The museum says this is one hound dog that'll be retired to a farm where he can chase real chickens.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

A children's museum in England had almost a million dollars worth of rare teddy bears - including one once owned by Elvis Presley. It was so valuable that the insurance company required guard dogs. Bad idea. One of the Dobermans went on what museum officials describe as a rampage, shredding hundreds of teddy bears, including the King's. That bear had his head ripped off. The museum says this is one hound dog that'll be retired to a farm. This is MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2006 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.