Lebanese-Americans Are Angry and Anxious Dearborn, Mich., just outside Detroit, is home to the largest Lebanese community in America. Residents here are passionate about the crisis in the Middle East.
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Lebanese-Americans Are Angry and Anxious

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Lebanese-Americans Are Angry and Anxious

Lebanese-Americans Are Angry and Anxious

Lebanese-Americans Are Angry and Anxious

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5627457/5627735" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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About half of Dearborn's Arab community turned out for a July 18 rally. Guy Raz, NPR hide caption

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Guy Raz, NPR

The Islamic Center in Dearborn is the largest Shiite mosque in the country. Guy Raz, NPR hide caption

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Guy Raz, NPR

Inside the Islamic Center in Dearborn, hundreds gather for discussion and support. Guy Raz, NPR hide caption

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Guy Raz, NPR

During daily protests in Dearborn, MI, some do not hesitate to compare the actions of Israeli forces to those of Nazi soldiers. Guy Raz, NPR hide caption

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Guy Raz, NPR

The Bint Jebail Cultural Center was founded by Lebanese-Americans who hail from Bint Jbeil, the southern Lebanese village where fighting is now raging. Guy Raz, NPR hide caption

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Guy Raz, NPR

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