Letters: Gay Slur; Hot Movies; Viola Listener comments include concern over the use of a gay slur and many suggestions for more movies where heat plays a major role. Also, a correction: the character in Twelfth Night who disguises herself as a man is Viola.
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Letters: Gay Slur; Hot Movies; Viola

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Letters: Gay Slur; Hot Movies; Viola

Letters: Gay Slur; Hot Movies; Viola

Letters: Gay Slur; Hot Movies; Viola

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5639618/5639619" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Listener comments include concern over the use of a gay slur and many suggestions for more movies where heat plays a major role. Also, a correction: the character in Twelfth Night who disguises herself as a man is Viola.

SCOTT SIMON, host:

Time now for your letters. First a correction. NPR's Laura Sydell reported a piece last week about the old literary game of disguised identity, now finding a new life among anonymous Internet users. Disguised as a plot device that dates back to Shakespeare, but Laura specifically mentioned Olivia in Twelfth Night. Oh-oh. Many of you set us straight. Viola is the real disguise artist of 12th Night. She survives a shipwreck and later assumes the identity of a man called Cesario.

On July 29th, we had a profile of Eric Monte, the former producer and TV writer. Mr. Monte became famous for the sitcom Good Times and the movie Cooley High, but faded from Hollywood and ended up in a homeless shelter. Near the end of the story, Mr. Monte said...

Mr. ERIC MONTE (Writer): I'm not sad about anything. I love life. I'm as happy as a sissy in Boys Town. My work ain't over.

SIMON: Martin Evans of New York, New York seemed to speak for many listeners. In your otherwise wonderful story about Eric Monte, I think you strayed far, far beyond the bounds of fairness to the homosexual community, by failing either to omit or challenge his homophobic reference. To air such a casual and unchallenged reference was shockingly unfair.

Also last week, we talked with our entertainment commentator, Elvis Mitchell, about movies in which heat is a prominent feature. We couldn't possibly include all the movies that mention, depict, or are otherwise enhanced by heat. So many of you added your favorites.

William Wallace of Mattituck, New York writes, How could you possibly have not mentioned Rear Window? My wife and I were astonished. My 22-month-old son even put down his Lego and asked, Do these guys know anything about movies?

(Soundbite of laughter)

SIMON: I'm not sure I believe this.

But in any event, the next letter is from Calperna Christian Berty(ph) from Portland, Oregon, who also pointed our attention to Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing, which unfolds on the hottest day of the year. And Dana Lynn Terry(ph) of Ellsworth, Wisconsin, adds, You missed The Long Hot Summer, one of my favorites. It would have been great to have heard a clip. So, Ms. Terry, this one's for you. Orson Welles as the patriarch, Will Verner.

(Soundbite of film The Long Hot Summer)

Mr. ORSON WELLES (Actor): (As Will Verner) Minnie, it sure is good to be alive this summer evening. Yeah, alive with friends and family and a big healthy woman to love ya. Oh, I like life, Minnie. Yeah. I like it so much, I might just live forever.

SIMON: To write us, you can come to our Web site, pull down the tab that says WEEKEND EDITION SATURDAY. And please tell us where you live and how to pronounce your name.

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