Murderer Reaps Benefits of Religious Conversion Darrell Mease, a convicted murderer, was scheduled to die in Missouri when his prayers were answered. Pope John Paul II won Mease, a Christian convert, a commutation of his death sentence during a 1999 Missouri visit.
NPR logo

Murderer Reaps Benefits of Religious Conversion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5656270/5656271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Murderer Reaps Benefits of Religious Conversion

Murderer Reaps Benefits of Religious Conversion

Murderer Reaps Benefits of Religious Conversion

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5656270/5656271" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Darrell Mease's death sentence was commuted by Missouri Gov. Mel Carnahan after a request from Pope John Paul II. Corbis Sygma hide caption

toggle caption
Corbis Sygma

Darrell Mease, right, whose death sentence was commuted by Missouri Gov. Mel Carnahan after a request from Pope John Paul II.

Corbis Sygma

Darrell Mease, a convicted murderer, was scheduled to die in Missouri when his prayers were answered. Pope John Paul II won Mease, a Christian convert, a commutation of his death sentence during a 1999 Missouri visit.

Steve Inskeep talks to author Michael Cuneo about his book Almost Midnight, which chronicles Mease's case.

Books Featured In This Story