Commuter Flight Crashes in Kentucky, Killing 49 A Comair commuter jet plane with 50 people on board has crashed near the Lexington, Ky., airport. Forty-nine are now confirmed dead, and the lone survivor is being treated at the University of Kentucky hospital. The county coronor says those who died appeared to have been killed by fire after the crash and not by the impact.
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Commuter Flight Crashes in Kentucky, Killing 49

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Commuter Flight Crashes in Kentucky, Killing 49

Commuter Flight Crashes in Kentucky, Killing 49

Commuter Flight Crashes in Kentucky, Killing 49

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5719903/5719904" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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A Comair commuter jet carrying 50 people crashed near the Lexington, Ky., airport Sunday morning. Forty-nine have been confirmed dead. The lone survivor, believed to be the first officer, is being treated at the University of Kentucky hospital.

Flight 51-91, headed for Atlanta, had just taken off from Blue Grass Airport when it crashed at 6:07 a.m. ET in a field about a mile from the airport. Reporters have not been able to get near the scene, which has been secured by local authorities.

Reports indicate the remnants of the plane are largely intact and that there was a fire following impact. The county coroner says those who died appeared to have been killed by the fire after the crash and not by the impact. A temporary morgue is being set up in Frankfurt, Ky.

There was no immediate word on what may have caused the crash. Reporters on scene have been asking pointed questions about which runway the plane used for takeoff and whether it was long enough, but officials said they could not determine that yet.

Laura Brown, an FAA spokeswoman, said that there is no indication of terrorism. The flight data recorders have been recovered from the scene and the National Transportation Safety Board, the FBI, and the FAA are sending investigators.

The Bombardier Canadair twin-engine jet was operated by Comair, which is a subsidiary of Delta Air Lines. It can seat as many as 50 with an additional three crew members.

The president of Comair, Don Bornhorst, has briefed reporters and pledged the airline's full cooperation in the investigation. Bornhorst said the crew was experienced and maintenance of the plane was up to date.