In New Orleans, Hope Helps at the Start of the Day "Where y'at?" "New Orleans," I'm happy to say, and I'm hoping to get to Mississippi tomorrow. I've made several reporting trips to the Gulf Coast, and it's good to be back this time for Mixed Signals. I'd forgotten the wide expanse of the sky, the flat-bottomed layers of cloud stacks, the pastel gold gleam of afternoon light you can see on the bayous from the airplane coming in. I'd been reading an Op-Ed piece in the New York Times by Sheila Bosworth. She recalled watching the daylight approach of Katrina: "She was beautiful coming in... a kaleidoscope of lavender, sage, yellow. None of us were surprised that Hurricane Katrina showed up decked out in the official colors of Carnival: purple, green and gold." Along the river, later, I walked in the wet, tangible air (there's a familiar faint scent of garbage as well). People, as always, were talking about Katrina, and now about the chances of Ernesto turning west. Early this morning on WWNO, I heard Morning Edition's This I Believe. A young man named Mike Miller talked about his return to the city, saying "Watermarks fade, tears dry, lives mend." Hope helps at the start of a day.
NPR logo In New Orleans, Hope Helps at the Start of the Day

In New Orleans, Hope Helps at the Start of the Day

A dispatch from Noah Adams, blogging from the Gulf Coast:

"Where y'at?" "New Orleans," I'm happy to say, and I'm hoping to get to Mississippi tomorrow. I've made several reporting trips to the Gulf Coast, and it's good to be back this time for Mixed Signals. I'd forgotten the wide expanse of the sky, the flat-bottomed layers of cloud stacks, the pastel gold gleam of afternoon light you can see on the bayous from the airplane coming in. I'd been reading an Op-Ed piece in the New York Times by Sheila Bosworth. She recalled watching the daylight approach of Katrina:

"She was beautiful coming in... a kaleidoscope of lavender, sage, yellow. None of us were surprised that Hurricane Katrina showed up decked out in the official colors of Carnival: purple, green and gold."

Along the river, later, I walked in the wet, tangible air (there's a familiar faint scent of garbage as well). People, as always, were talking about Katrina, and now about the chances of Ernesto turning west. Early this morning on WWNO, I heard Morning Edition's This I Believe. A young man named Mike Miller talked about his return to the city, saying "Watermarks fade, tears dry, lives mend." Hope helps at the start of a day.