Poverty Measure Yields Misleading Numbers The latest poverty numbers from the Census Bureau don't add up, writes Nicholas Eberstadt in Sunday's Washington Post. Americans living below the poverty line today, he argues, have a much higher standard of living than those living in poverty in the 1960s, when the poverty rate was devised.
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Poverty Measure Yields Misleading Numbers

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Poverty Measure Yields Misleading Numbers

Poverty Measure Yields Misleading Numbers

Poverty Measure Yields Misleading Numbers

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The latest poverty numbers from the Census Bureau don't add up, writes Nicholas Eberstadt in Sunday's Washington Post. Americans living below the poverty line today, he argues, have a much higher standard of living than those living in poverty in the 1960s, when the poverty rate was devised.

Guest:

Nick Eberstadt, a Henry Wendt Scholar in political economy at the American Enterprise Institute

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