Don't Miss: Vampire Plant Sniffs Out Its Prey They call it strangleweed, devil guts, witches shoelaces... It is the dodder plant, a vampiric weed that seeks out its prey, coils around it and begins to drain its host of its lifeblood. NPR's David Malakoff has a piece on the dodder tonight. What is interesting (besides the whole obviously-created-by-Satan thing) is that scientists have figured out how the plant finds its prey. It smells them. Give it a whiff of tomato and it begins to creep toward the plant. And it likes tomatoes better than, say, wheat. Yet one more sure sign of the apocalypse.
NPR logo Don't Miss: Vampire Plant Sniffs Out Its Prey

Don't Miss: Vampire Plant Sniffs Out Its Prey

The parasitic dodder vine wraps around the stem of a tomato plant before strangling it. De Moraes and Mescher Labs hide caption

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De Moraes and Mescher Labs

The parasitic dodder vine wraps around the stem of a tomato plant before strangling it.

De Moraes and Mescher Labs

They call it strangleweed, devil guts, witches shoelaces... It is the dodder plant, a vampiric weed that seeks out its prey, coils around it and begins to drain its host of its lifeblood. NPR's David Malakoff has a piece on the dodder tonight. What is interesting (besides the whole obviously-created-by-Satan thing) is that scientists have figured out how the plant finds its prey. It smells them. Give it a whiff of tomato and it begins to creep toward the plant. And it likes tomatoes better than, say, wheat.

Yet one more sure sign of the apocalypse.