Science of an Explosion North Korea claims to have joined the nuclear club with an underground test Sunday night. Intelligence agencies say they detected a large explosion, but questions remain. How can you tell is an explosion was nuclear, how do you measure an underground detonation, and what do the numbers tell us?
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Science of an Explosion

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Science of an Explosion

Science of an Explosion

Science of an Explosion

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North Korea claims to have joined the nuclear club with an underground test Sunday night. Intelligence agencies say they detected a large explosion, but questions remain. How can you tell is an explosion was nuclear, how do you measure an underground detonation, and what do the numbers tell us?

Guest:

Robert Norris, senior research associate at the Natural Resources Defense Council in Washington, D.C.