The Kamikaze Hearts: 'No One Called You a Failure' Defining their sound as "upstate porch rock," The Kamikaze Hearts craft songs to tell tales. "No One Called You a Failure," from their fifth recording, Oneida Road, centers on the thoughts a parent has while picking up a child gone astray.
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The Kamikaze Hearts: 'No One Called You a Failure'

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The Kamikaze Hearts: 'No One Called You a Failure'

The Kamikaze Hearts: 'No One Called You a Failure'

The Kamikaze Hearts: 'No One Called You a Failure'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6354143/6355002" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

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The Kamikaze Hearts

Defining their sound as "upstate porch rock," The Kamikaze Hearts craft songs to tell tales. Based in Albany, NY, their alternative country style features acoustic guitar, brushed snare drum and floor tom, acoustic bass, mandolin, banjo and dobro. "No One Called You a Failure," from their fifth recording, Oneida Road, centers on thoughts a parent has while picking up a child gone astray.

Influenced by an broad swath of artists, including Black Sabbath and The Mountain Goats, the Kamikaze Hearts have performed at art galleries, honky-tonk bars, barn throwdowns and rock clubs. In September of 2004, NPR member station WAMC featured a live, two-hour Kamikaze Hearts performance. Metroland Magazine, an alternative newsweekly in New York, said, "The Kamikaze Hearts have the potential to be big, and we mean that in a nine-point-review-on-Pitchfork, top-ranking-on-the-College Music Journal-charts sort of way."

The Kamikaze Hearts' latest album, Oneida, took three years to make and, along with their usual lineup of instruments, includes electric guitars, keyboards, slide guitars and "choir-like" vocals. Band members say this is the studio album fans always knew they could make, and goes beyond their normal acoustic sound.