Sizing Up the 2006 Vote in Broken Bow What do residents of a Central Nebraska town have to say about the state of U.S. politics heading into the midterm elections? A recent visit gave us the chance to listen in at the City Cafe, Evans Feed Store and other local gathering places.
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Sizing Up the 2006 Vote in Broken Bow

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Sizing Up the 2006 Vote in Broken Bow

Sizing Up the 2006 Vote in Broken Bow

Sizing Up the 2006 Vote in Broken Bow

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6359915/6359916" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A view of businesses on Broken Bow's town square. Ned Wharton, NPR hide caption

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Ned Wharton, NPR

Bill Reichert has taught music in Broken Bow for 33 years. Ned Wharton, NPR hide caption

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Ned Wharton, NPR

Bill Reichert has taught music in Broken Bow for 33 years.

Ned Wharton, NPR

Patriotism and football are unifying forces in Nebraska. American flags and Cornhusker banners adorn walls in stores, restaurants and homes.

Generally, it's Republican country. President Bush carried the state with solid majorities in 2000 and 2004. The governor is a Republican. Sen. Ben Nelson is the only elected Democrat representing Nebraska in Washington. Sen. Chuck Hagel is a Republican, and all three House members are with the GOP, too.

In short, Nebraska is a red state.

But these are trying times for the Republican party. So what do residents of Broken Bow, Neb., have to say about the state of U.S. politics heading into the midterm elections? A recent visit gave us the chance to listen in at the City Cafe, Evans Feed Store and other local gathering places.