U.S. Officials Assess Afghanistan Progress Five years after America invaded, Afghanistan is still very much a nation in transition. It's also home to a large contingent of Americans.
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U.S. Officials Assess Afghanistan Progress

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U.S. Officials Assess Afghanistan Progress

U.S. Officials Assess Afghanistan Progress

U.S. Officials Assess Afghanistan Progress

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Gen. Karl Eikenberry (right), commanding general talks with Afghan National Army soldiers at their remote firebase near the Pakistani border in Afghanistan, Oct. 22, 2006. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Gen. Karl Eikenberry (right), commanding general talks with Afghan National Army soldiers at their remote firebase near the Pakistani border in Afghanistan, Oct. 22, 2006.

AFP/Getty Images

Five years after America invaded, Afghanistan is still very much a nation in transition. It's also home to a large contingent of Americans.

Lt. Gen. Karl Eikenberry talks with Renee Montagne about the challenges American troops face with the Taliban. Montagne also talks with Ronald E. Neumann, the U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan.