Mayor, Strip-Club Owners Battle in Seattle Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels has pushed into law new regulations for exotic dance clubs. Performers are now required to keep a certain distance from patrons, and clubs must be well-lit. But strip-club owners argue that naked dancing is free speech, and have struck back with a referendum on the November ballot to counter the new rules.
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Mayor, Strip-Club Owners Battle in Seattle

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Mayor, Strip-Club Owners Battle in Seattle

Mayor, Strip-Club Owners Battle in Seattle

Mayor, Strip-Club Owners Battle in Seattle

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6374994/6374995" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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In Seattle, the most attention-getting local issue on the ballot this year is a referendum on strip clubs. The city wants to enforce stricter regulations — turning up the lights, for one thing. But the clubs are fighting back — by appealing directly to the voters.

Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels has pushed into law new regulations for exotic dance clubs. Performers are now required to keep a certain distance from patrons, and clubs must be well-lit.

But strip club owners argue that naked dancing is free speech, and have struck back with a referendum on the November ballot to counter the new rules.