Iraq War Vets Return; Some Have No Home National Guard Cpl. Joe Raicaldo is home from Iraq with things he didn't have when he left: an honorable discharge, metal rods and screws up and down his spine, and an arm that moves like a robot's. He's also homeless, living in his car. There are at least 600 recent vets who are homeless.
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Iraq War Vets Return; Some Have No Home

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Iraq War Vets Return; Some Have No Home

Iraq War Vets Return; Some Have No Home

Iraq War Vets Return; Some Have No Home

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6394180/6394442" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Joe Raicaldo leans against the '98 Plymouth he has been living in since his honorable discharge from the Army after he was injured in Iraq. Libby Lewis, NPR hide caption

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Libby Lewis, NPR

National Guard Cpl. Joe Raicaldo is home from Iraq with things he didn't have when he left: an honorable discharge, metal rods and screws up and down his spine, and an arm that moves like a robot's. He's also homeless, living in his car. There are at least 600 recent vets who are homeless.

Raicaldo's story is one that tells how hard it is going to be to weave some of America's warriors back into the fabric of home.

An Evolving Government Approach to Homeless Vets

Homeless veterans attend a 2003 Veterans Day Wreath Ceremony in New York City. Approximately one-third of all homeless men in New York City are U.S. veterans. Nationwide, nearly a half-million veterans are homeless during the course of a year. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Bonus marchers fight with D.C. police at a camp on Pennsylvania Avenue. The marchers were World War I veterans who demanded payment of a promised bonus that had been delayed. With the advent of the Great Depression, frustration over the delayed bonus turned to anger. General Douglas MacArthur Foundation hide caption

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General Douglas MacArthur Foundation