Why 'Islamofascism' May Create New U.S. Enemies A growing number of conservative commentators, policymakers and even the president have used the term "Islamofascist" to refer to Islamist extremists. But critics argue that the term offends millions of Muslims by suggesting Islam itself is the enemy.
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Why 'Islamofascism' May Create New U.S. Enemies

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Why 'Islamofascism' May Create New U.S. Enemies

Why 'Islamofascism' May Create New U.S. Enemies

Why 'Islamofascism' May Create New U.S. Enemies

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/6412169/6412599" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Intellectuals of Islamism

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An Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood supporter holds a banner reading in Arabic "Martyrs for Islam," as another displays a copy of the holy Koran during a demonstration in Cairo, Sept. 22, 2006. Getty Images hide caption

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Intellectuals of Islamism

The modern Islamist movement was heavily influenced by the founders and early leaders in the Muslim Brotherhood. Here, two whose influence is still felt today.